IMMA Collection

Photo Ros Kavanagh

This page connects you to IMMA, our associate organisation which holds a copy of a number of Irish artists' moving image works that are detailed in the MExIndex.


 

IMMA moving image collections statement

IMMA is home to the National Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art, with over 3,500 artworks by Irish and International artists. The Collection is firmly rooted in the present and important contemporary works are added each year. Our collection of modern art, which has a particular emphasis on work from the 1940s onwards, is regularly enhanced by donation or loan. 

Artists’ moving image works have featured extensively in IMMA’s programming history since 1991 and form a key part of the Collection. Recently, many of these works have been digitised from analogue formats such as VHS tape and Laserdisc as part of a large-scale Collection & Programme Digitisation Project funded by the Department of Culture, Heritage & the Gaeltacht. This process preserves the works for the future while also allowing greater access to audiences and researchers. A number of recent programming initiatives highlight the Museum’s holdings of moving image work as a significant national collection of artists’ film and video.

Dust Defying Gravity, Grace Weir, 2004

'Dust defying gravity consists of a single 4 minute tracking shot that traces through the rooms at Dunsink Observatory, documenting the aging telescopes and measuring instruments arrayed throughout the building. As the camera passes over a mechanical model of the solar system, the dust in the air of the room becomes visible, floating and scintillating like a field of stars.’

Everything Dissapears, Kevin Gaffney, 2014

Everything Disappears was filmed in Taipei with four participants, Revanshu, William Hsu, Lucie Chen and Issac Tsai, who answered an open call to perform in a film exploring self-image, identity and relationships. Gaffney worked closely with the participants, formulating scenes together in a collaborative process and filming each participant in their home.

Cassandra's Necklace, Alice Maher, 2012

Cassandra’s Necklace is a two-screen film installation which challenges the mythological archetype of the voiceless female. The protagonist wanders a cavernous landscape in search of a stolen voice. Charlie Murphy plays the mythological figure, Cassandra, with Rossi O’Donnell Bradley as the young girl. The sound track is by Trevor Knight.

Melancholia, Cecily Brennan, 2005

This documentary addresses the long-held public belief in a connection between madness and artistic creativity. The documentary combines a dramatised section with interviews with artists, researchers and academics. These interwoven strands contrast the chaos and torment of mental collapse with the careful rationality of psychiatric research and the views of working artists.